Vintage Europe with Seabourne

Vintage Europe with Seabourne

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Vintage Europe with Seabourne

The great period of “the Discoveries” accounted for phenomenal wealth brought back from India, Africa and Brazil by the great Portuguese navigators. Gold, jewels, ivory, porcelain and spices helped finance grand new buildings and impressive monuments in Lisbon, the country’s capital city. As you sail up the Tagus River, be on deck to admire Lisbon’s panorama and see some of the great monuments lining the river. Lisbon is one of Europe’s smallest capital cities but considered by many visitors to be one of the most likeable. Spread over a string of seven hills, the city offers a variety of faces, including a refreshing no-frills simplicity reflected in the people as they go unhurriedly through their day enjoying a hearty and delicious cuisine accompanied by the country’s excellent wines.

Expired on Saturday June 6th, 2020

Expired on Saturday June 6th, 2020

May 23 Lisbon, Portugal

The great period of "the Discoveries" accounted for phenomenal wealth brought back from India, Africa and Brazil by the great Portuguese navigators. Gold, jewels, ivory, porcelain and spices helped finance grand new buildings and impressive monuments in Lisbon, the country's capital city. As you sail up the Tagus River, be on deck to admire Lisbon's panorama and see some of the great monuments lining the river. Lisbon is one of Europe's smallest capital cities but considered by many visitors to be one of the most likeable. Spread over a string of seven hills, the city offers a variety of faces, including a refreshing no-frills simplicity reflected in the people as they go unhurriedly through their day enjoying a hearty and delicious cuisine accompanied by the country's excellent wines.

This ancient port city on the green Atlantic coast of Spain has a history of some 3,000 years. From its humble beginnings the city has grown to become an important port city in Spain. Its old historic fishing village Cimadevilla with its picturesque cobble stoned streets and old-world architecture remains today its main tourist attraction.

Straddling the banks of an estuary opening into the Bay of Biscay, Bilbao is the largest city in Spain’s northeastern Basque Country. Its earliest beginnings are preserved in the Casco Viejo, seven medieval streets that used to be guarded by walls. There visitors will find the city’s old churches, a large market, a public theater and the Academy of the Basque Language. Nearby sources of iron ore made Bilbao an important industrial and shipping center from the 14th century onward. The Spanish Civil War also started here. Today the city is being transformed by a growing service economy, and its prominence on the global traveler’s radar may be dated from the 1997 inauguration of the striking Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. In fact, the estuary town has become a veritable magnet for architects, boasting notable masterworks including Santiago Calatrava’s beautiful Zubizuri (“White Bridge” in Basque) and airport complex, the 541-foot Iberdrola Tower by the Argentine Cesar Pelli, a subway system by Norman Foster, the 1909 wine warehouse called Alhóndiga, converted a century later by designer Philippe Starck and the Euskalduna Conference Centre and Concert Hall by Federico Soriano and Dolores Palacios. The Zorrozuarre area is also being redeveloped, following a 2007 master plan by the Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid. For views of all of this, take the funicular from the city center to the top of Mt. Artxanda, where a sports complex, restaurants and a balcony await you.

Smaller than its neighbors St-Jean-de-Luz or Biarritz, Hendaye forms the political border between France and Spain on the Cote Basque, where the Pyrenees come down to meet the Atlantic. Politics aside, the whole area is culturally Basque, and the Basque language and flag are frequently heard and seen. Biarritz benefitted from the presence of the Empress Eugenie of France, who built a palace on the beach there in 1854 that survives as the Hotel du Palais. That attracted Europe’s crowned heads and secured its reputation as a seaside resort.

Stretching from Pointe de Grave on the sea in southwest France about 80 km/50mi up to the city of Bordeaux, the Gironde Estuary is the largest in Europe. It is formed by the merger of the Dordogne and Garonne Rivers just below Bordeaux. The estuary varies from 3km/2mi to 11km/7mi wide, and its shores include some of France’s most treasured wine-producing lands. On the Left Bank are the Medoc and Graves regions, while the Right Bank includes the Libournais, Bourg and Blaye regions. Islands passed in the Gironde include the large Ile de Patiras with some vines and a lighthouse, Ile Sans-Pain and Ile Bouchard. Ile Paté is privately owned, and contains a ruined 17th century fort. The small Ile Verte, Ile du Nord and Ile Cazeau are left in their natural states as reserves for migrating birds. Ile Margaux is planted with vines, and is part of the Medoc wine region.

Bordeaux is the starting point for many exciting excursions into the surrounding wine country. The patricians of Bordeaux have always been merchants and shipbuilders. Under the Romans the city had a flourishing trade with Spain and Britain. In 1154, as a part of the dowry of Eleanor of Aquitaine, it became English and remained so until 1453. In the 18th century, Bordeaux prospered from the slave trade, and later in commerce with French colonies in Africa. Since Roman times the quality of the region's vines and wines has been zealously maintained.

Blessed by a mild climate and bucolic surroundings, Torquay on the southern Devon coast proclaims itself the English Riviera. Its palm-lined waterfront warrants the name, and it is indeed one of England’s most popular resorts. Agatha Christie was born and lived here, and you can follow the plaques and pathways of the Agatha Christie Mile to learn about her life and work. The Kent’s Cave Prehistoric Site unveils 40,000 years of human habitation, while the nearby Dartmoor parks preserve unspoiled natural tors and moors that are older still. Stroll the tranquil lanes of Cockington Village, lined with traditional thatched houses, local arts and crafts galleries and friendly pubs. The magnificent Torquay Pavilion celebrates the opulent Victorian age of Devonshire tourism.

The seaport and naval station of Cherbourg is situated along the English Channel northwest of Paris at the mouth of the Divette River. Believed to rest on the site of an ancient Roman station, Cherbourg has been occupied since ancient times and was frequently contested by the French and English in the Middle Ages because of its strategic location. Most recently passed to France in the late 18th century, the town was extensively fortified by Louis XVI. During WWII the Germans held Cherbourg until it was captured by the American forces shortly after the Normandy landings. Following a vast rehabilitation program that returned it to working condition, Cherbourg became an important Allied supply port. Today, Cherbourg is important for transatlantic shipping, shipbuilding, electronics and telephone equipment manufacturing, yachting and commercial fishing.

This coastal port is our portal to the fairytale charms of Bruges, and almost unbearably romantic medieval town laced with canals. The central square confronts the visitor with four solid walls of fretted towers, elaborate edifices and soaring spires. One of the best ways to enjoy the town is to ride the swan-dotted canals on a boat tour. Or sroll around and pop into any of the open buildings to absorb the confectionary decoration. Speaking of confections, the town is justly famous for its fine Belgian chocolate. They even have a museum dedicated the Flemish invention of thinly cut, crisply fried potatoes that earned the inaccurate misnomer “French Fries!”

A clever floating mooring near the Greenwich Naval Observatory provides your Seabourn ship its proximityGreenwich is a Royal Borough of London, located on a broad meander of the River Thames south-east of central London. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, for its maritime history as well as its connection to the Royal Family. The Palace of Placentia has stood on a hill here since the 15th Century. It was the birthplace of both Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth I. The buildings were later incorporated into the Old Royal Naval College. Visitors are invited to explore the College, the Royal Observatory (site of the Prime Meridian) and the National Maritime Museum.

On the riverfront, the 19th century clipper Cutty Sark, Sir Francis Chichester’s yacht Gypsy Moth IVand a Royal Navy destroyer HMS Defender are museum ships. The modern structures of the O2 entertainment complex stand on the peninsula nearby. A floating mooring pier provides a berth for your Seabourn ship, offering easy access to both Greenwich and the city of London visible in the distance. to London. One of the world's premier cities.

The Thames is the longest river that is entirely in England, running 217 miles to the sea. Its Tideway estuary has a rise and fall of 23 feet. Your Seabourn ship can navigate to just above Greenwich, near London proper.

Rotterdam’s skyline includes some of the most eclectic and daring architecture in Europe, resulting from the fact that most of the city was destroyed during Allied bombing in World War II during its Nazi occupation. Today it is Europe’s largest port. Only three buildings in the city center survived, the Art Deco City Hall, the Great St. Laurence church from 1499, and the 10-storey, Art Nouveau style White House from 1898. Delfshaven is the oldest existing neighborhood of Rotterdam, dating mostly from the 17th century. The city is rich in museums, with the Boymans van Beuningen being the most extensive art collection, from the 14th century forward. The striking Kunsthal designed by architect Rem Koolhaas, is a work of art in itself. Rotterdam has only seven windmills remaining, but a short trip to nearby Kinderdijk takes you to the UNESCO World Heritage Site containing 19 classic Dutch windmills. Other options for excursions from Rotterdam include half- or full-day tours to Amsterdam or to the 17th century charms of Gouda.

The delightfully attractive city of Amsterdam is home to many of the world's great art treasures, and is a major center of the glamorous diamond trade as well. Unique architectural styles of the past blend with superb modern structures, and the web of curved and straight canals makes the city as easy to traverse by water as by land. The hospitality of the local people has been remarked upon by generations of travelers, and the Dutch's respect for and tolerance of the beliefs of others has attracted refugees from around the world for centuries.

Ship: Seabourn Ovation

Date Veranda Suite Penthouse Suite Penthouse Spa Suite Owner’s Suite & Above
23 May 2020 – 6 June 2020 From $12,999 From $23,999 From $26,499 From $30,499

Fares shown are in AUDAU$, per person, based on double occupancy

For further information on this or any other packages please Call us on 1300 968 787 or mail info@yourholidays.com.au

Expired on Saturday June 6th, 2020

Expired on Saturday June 6th, 2020

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